; iPhoneReporting: NealAugenstein

iPhoneReporting: NealAugenstein

Posts tagged neal

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Vine’s got some major competition.

Instagram can now shoot 15 seconds of video, compared with Vine’s 6. You can choose one of 13 filters, select a cover frame, and share easily.

I’ve been pretty outspoken that while Vine and Instagram are capable of easy, fun, and in some cases very artistic videos, there are better alternatives for #iphonereporting.

Unless you’re just shooting and posting, shooting and posting, shooting and posting, editing counts — and you can’t do much of it on Vine or Instagram.

In Instagram you can delete your most recent snippet, Vine has no editing.

In a real news situation, I’d likely shoot with the built-in camera, edit in Voddio, upload to YouTube, and tweet it.

Still, there is something to be said for fun.

Filed under iphonereporting neal augenstein mobile iphone vine instagram

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How iOS 7 will improve #iphonereporting

When Apple’s new iOS 7 debuts in Fall, two features I believe could mean major improvements for #iphonereporting are FaceTime Audio and AirDrop.
I’m not a developer, and don’t have a beta version with which to experiment, so these are just first impressions on how the new operating system could benefit journalists, public relations professionals, and newsmakers.


FaceTime Audio
Forward-thinking Nick Garnett of the BBC has pioneered doing live reports with FaceTime, in its current video configuration.
In my testing, the connection is generally more stable than Skype, in both WiFi and LTE.
During FaceTime video, the microphone used is located in the phone’s earpiece (where you listen during a standard phone call), next to the front camera.
Holding that microphone a few inches from your mouth provides good, but slightly tinny audio (and a close-up view of your tonsils to the person on the other end of the video chat.)
With FaceTime Audio I’m hopeful the microphone engaged will be the far-superior microphone located on the bottom of the iPhone, directly to the left of the charging part.
The microphone on the bottom of the phone has much better bass response. I use that built-in bottom mic for the majority of my #iphonereporting.

AirDrop
To this point, it’s required some wired connections to transfer videos and photos taken on iPhone to iPad for editing. AirDrop will allow wireless sharing between devices (as long as you have an AirCloud account).

If you’re enthusiastic about how other iOS 7 features could help in #iphonereporting, I’d love to hear about them!

How iOS 7 will improve #iphonereporting

When Apple’s new iOS 7 debuts in Fall, two features I believe could mean major improvements for #iphonereporting are FaceTime Audio and AirDrop.

I’m not a developer, and don’t have a beta version with which to experiment, so these are just first impressions on how the new operating system could benefit journalists, public relations professionals, and newsmakers.

FaceTime Audio

Forward-thinking Nick Garnett of the BBC has pioneered doing live reports with FaceTime, in its current video configuration.

In my testing, the connection is generally more stable than Skype, in both WiFi and LTE.

During FaceTime video, the microphone used is located in the phone’s earpiece (where you listen during a standard phone call), next to the front camera.

Holding that microphone a few inches from your mouth provides good, but slightly tinny audio (and a close-up view of your tonsils to the person on the other end of the video chat.)

With FaceTime Audio I’m hopeful the microphone engaged will be the far-superior microphone located on the bottom of the iPhone, directly to the left of the charging part.

The microphone on the bottom of the phone has much better bass response. I use that built-in bottom mic for the majority of my #iphonereporting.

AirDrop

To this point, it’s required some wired connections to transfer videos and photos taken on iPhone to iPad for editing. AirDrop will allow wireless sharing between devices (as long as you have an AirCloud account).

If you’re enthusiastic about how other iOS 7 features could help in #iphonereporting, I’d love to hear about them!

Filed under iphonereporting mobile neal augenstein wtop reporting journalism

25 notes

Silence is golden. And embarrassing.

It’s happened to every reporter — you attempt to play back a recorded interview, and have the horrible realization you failed to capture the audio.

Here’s how to avoid that moment of anger, frustration, and shame if you’re reporting on your iPhone.

First, in Settings, turn ON Airplane Mode, which will prevent your phone from ringing during your recorded interview.

Once you begin recording audio, you can lock your iPhone in Record On by doing something that seems counterintuitive — touching the On-Off button on the top of the iPhone.

Your screen will actually go dark, and you’ll likely think “oh no, I turned off my phone.”

Yet, when you touch the Home button to ‘revive’ your phone, you’ll see your audio app has continued to run in the background while the screen was dark and your audio has been safely recorded.

So simple, yet so important.

Filed under iphone reporting neal augenstein wtop editing mobile on off

7 notes

Do THIS Before Your Next Interview

Load Skype on your smartphone.

Your voice will SOUND much better on the air.

It’s free, it’s easy to set up and use, and you will set yourself apart from other newsmakers and PR people who rely on lousy cell or landline connections.

Anyone with a fairly recent smartphone can establish a free Skype account, at www.skype.com.

Using voice over Internet technology, you can make free calls to other Skype users.

With Skype you don’t need to know a person’s phone number — you’ll want to know their contact account name.

For instance, if we were going to do an interview, I’d tell you our Skype account is wtopnews.

Once you establish your free Skype account, and download it on your phone, you would Search Skype Directory, and add wtopnews to your contacts.

When it’s time for the interview, you press Call, and a notification pops up on our newsroom computer that you are calling. We click Answer, and we’re connected.

Or, I can call you, once I know your Skype contact name.

As in any phone conversation, you hear through the earpiece and speak into the mouthpiece.

If you’re in a wifi hot spot, and especially if using an iPhone, or iPod Touch, as I record our conversation you will likely sound almost as good as if you were using expensive broadcast equipment.

If your office has wifi, you can sit at your desk, with all your creature comforts, while speaking into your “smartphone-turned-broadcast-microphone.”

If you’re on the road, even when relying on a 3G connection, you will sound markedly better using a Skype connection than dialing a “regular” phone call.

Since you care about sounding good, make sure journalists know you are Skype-equipped.

When pitching stories, include your Skype contact address.

Include your Skype address on your business card.

When a reporter calls for an interview, ask “would you like to do this on Skype?”

With radio news on FM, HD, satellite, and streamed online, “can you hear me now” won’t cut it anymore.

Download Skype on your phone — you won’t regret it. And let me know if you have any questions.

Filed under wtop neal augenstein skype